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PACKAGE ISBN-13: 9780205840151

By James H. Merrell, Jerald Podair, Andrew Kersten

Published by Pearson

Published Date: Oct 22, 2013

Components of the Package:

American Conversations: From Centennial through Millennium, Volume 2
By James H. Merrell, Jerald Podair, Andrew Kersten

MySearchLab -- Valuepack Access Card
By . . Pearson Education

Description

Presents primary source readings in American history to help students identify with the nation’s past.


American Conversations is a two-volume anthology of original primary sources in United States history. It features texts by famous and obscure Americans, seeking to reflect the voices of Native Americans, African Americans, women, and workers out of the backwaters onto the historical mainstream by devoting attention to these “forgotten” Americans. At the same time, the text acquaints students with leading figures and core texts. This juxtaposition offers a richer understanding of American history.


The people and texts presented will resonate powerfully with the contemporary American conversation. Whatever today’s topic–race relations, the battle of the sexes, protest or piety, or unum vs. pluribus–readers will find its roots in these pages.


A better teaching and learning experience
This program will provide a better teaching and learning experience–for you and your students. Here’s how:

  • Personalize Learning- MySearchLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals.
  • Improve Critical Thinking- Suggested answers and discussion topics are provided in the appendix.
  • Engage Students- Images are used as an indispensable tool for illuminating the past. To sharpen the reader’s eye, American Conversations includes three chapters devoted exclusively to visual texts. Additionally, substantive head notes accompany the longer passages.
  • Support Instructors- MySearchLab and Class Preparation are available.

For volume 1 of this text, search ISBN-10: 0132446839  

 

Note: MySearchLab does not come automatically packaged with this text. To purchase MySearchLab, please visit: www.mysearchlab.com or you can purchase a ValuePack of the text + MySearchLab (at no additional cost): ValuePack ISBN-10: 0205840159 / ValuePack ISBN-13: 9780205840151.

Table of Contents

Found in this Section:

1. Brief Table of Contents

2. Full Table of Contents

 


1. BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Preface

Acknowledgements

About the Authors

Introduction

 

Chapter 1: "...We contend that the employer has no right to speculate on starvation..."

Chapter 2: "Today we find collisions between...capital and labor, when there should be combination."

Chapter 3: "How does it feel to be a problem?"

Chapter 4: "The failure of the melting-pot, far from closing the great American democratic  experiment, means that it has only just begun."

Chapter 5: "Women, more than men, succumb to marriage."

Chapter 6: "I am an American individualist."

Chapter 7: "They're just working. They don't know what for. They're just in a rut and keep on in it."

Chapter 8: "Let us now praise famous men..."

Chapter 9: "They are now at the crossroads."

Chapter 10: "Freedom of Speech...Freedom to Worship...Freedom from Want...Freedom from Fear."

Chapter 11: "God or man?"

Chapter 12: "I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked..."

Chapter 13: "A big-shouldered youth with sideburns and a full-lipped face wandered slowly on stage..."

Chapter 14: "...(A) secure and reasonably happy household, a contented and proud  husband...(T)hese creations call for the distinctive talents of women."

Chapter 15: "I invite you to sit down in front of your television set...I can assure you that you will observe a vast wasteland."

Chapter 16: "In the future everyone will be famous for fifteen minutes."

Chapter 17: "We regard men as infinitely precious and possessed of unfulfilled capacities for reason, freedom, and love."     

Chapter 18: "We don't go for segregation. We go for separation."

Chapter 19: "I can't get out, and I can't finish it with what I have got. And I don't know what the hell to do!"

Chapter 20: “Bitch is Beautiful.”

Chapter 21: "Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!"

Chapter 22: "Whatever happened to civic engagement?"

Chapter 23: "Conflict between civilizations will be the latest phase in the evolution of conflict in the modern world."

 

Afterword

Further Readings

 


2. FULL TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Preface

Acknowledgements

About the Authors

Introduction

 

Chapter 1: "...We contend that the employer has no right to speculate on starvation..."

Workers and Owners Battle During the Great Railroad Strike of 1877

A Striker, Fair Wages (1877)

Thomas A. Scott, The Recent Strikes (1877)

 

Chapter 2: "Today we find collisions between...capital and labor, when there should be combination."

Andrew Carnegie Counsels Class Cooperation                          

An Employer's View of the Labor Question (1886)

Results of the Labor Struggle (1886)

 

Chapter 3: "How does it feel to be a problem?"

W. E. B. Du Bois Calls for an American Pluralism

Of Our Spiritual Strivings  (1903)

Of Mr. Booker T. Washington and Others (1903)   

 

Chapter 4: "The failure of the melting-pot, far from closing the great American democratic  experiment, means that it has only just begun."

Randolph Bourne Transcends the "Melting-Pot" Idea

Trans-National America (1916)

 

Chapter 5: "Women, more than men, succumb to marriage."

Crystal Eastman Reimagines the Institution of Marriage

Marriage Under Two Roofs (1923)

 

Chapter 6: "I am an American individualist."

Herbert Hoover Champions Individualist Values

American Individualism (1923)

 

Chapter 7: "They're just working. They don't know what for. They're just in a rut and keep on in it."

Robert and Helen Lynd Search for Modern America

Middletown (1929)

 

Chapter 8: "Let us now praise famous men..."

Walker Evans and Dorothea Lange Photograph the Great Depression

James Agee, Let Us Now Praise Famous Men (1941)

Walker    Evans, Photographs from Let Us Now Praise Famous Men (1936)

Dorothea Lange, “Migrant Mother”  (1936)

         

Chapter 9: "They are now at the crossroads."

Charles Kikuchi Copes With War Relocation

The Kikuchi Diary: Chronicle From an American Concentration Camp (1973)

Dorothea Lange, Photographs of the Japanese Internment (1942)

                  

Chapter 10: "Freedom of Speech...Freedom to Worship...Freedom from Want...Freedom from Fear."

Norman Rockwell Sees America as It Sees Itself

“Four Freedoms Poster” (“Ours to Fight For”) (1942)

 

Chapter 11: "God or man?"

Whittaker Chambers Defends the Anticommunist Impulse

Witness(1952)

 

Chapter 12: "I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked..."

Allen Ginsberg Begins the Counterculture

Howl (1956)

 

Chapter 13: "A big-shouldered youth with sideburns and a full-lipped face wandered slowly on stage..."

Elvis Presley Shakes Up America

Jean Yothers, Presley Makes 'Em Shriek, Yell, Jump (1956)

Ralph J. Gleason, Presley Leaves You in a Blue Suede Funk (1956)

William McPhillips, Elvis Hits Town and Teenagers Turn Out(1956)

Anne Rowe, Broom-Sweeping Elvis a Regular Guy (1956)

14,600   Fans Squeal, Jump as Elvis Shakes, Gyrates (1957)

 

Chapter 14: "...(A) secure and reasonably happy household, a contented and proud  husband...(T)hese creations call for the distinctive talents of women."

Life Magazine Examines "The American Woman" of the 1950s

An Introduction by Mrs. Peter Marshall (1956)

Mary Ellen Chase, She Misses Some Goals (1956)

Emily Kimbrough, She Needs Some Years of Grace (1956)

Busy Wife's Achievements (1956)

Phyllis McGinley, Women are Wonderful (1956)

Cornelia Otis Skinner, Women are Misguided (1956)

 

Chapter 15: "I invite you to sit down in front of your television set...I can assure you that you will observe a vast wasteland."

Newton Minow Takes On Television's "Wasteland"

Television and the Public Interest (0000)

 

Chapter 16: "In the future everyone will be famous for fifteen minutes."

Andy Warhol Celebrates the Mundane

Marilyn Diptych (1962)

Two Hundred Campbell’s Soup Cans (1962)  

Five Coke Bottles (1962)

 

Chapter 17: "We regard men as infinitely precious and possessed of unfulfilled capacities for reason, freedom, and love."

Students for a Democratic Society Revives American Radicalism

Students for a Democratic Society, Port Huron Statement (1962)

         

Chapter 18: "We don't go for segregation. We go for separation."

Malcolm X Rejects American Pluralism

Twenty Million Black People in a Political, Economic, and Mental Prison (1963)

 

Chapter 19: "I can't get out, and I can't finish it with what I have got. And I don't know what the hell to do!"

Vietnam Traps Lyndon Johnson

Excerpts from White House Tapes (1964-65)

 

Chapter 20: “Bitch is Beautiful.”

Jo Freeman Redefines the American Woman

The Bitch Manifesto (1968)

 

Chapter 21: "Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate! Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!"

Ronald Reagan Confronts Marxism and Big Government

Encroaching Control (1961)

A Time for Choosing (1964)

First Inaugural Address (1981)

Address to Members of the British Parliament (1982)

Remarks at the Annual Convention of the National Association of Evangelicals, Orlando (1983)

Remarks at the Brandenburg Gate (1987)

 

Chapter 22: "Whatever happened to civic engagement?"

Robert Putnam Decries the Solitary Bowler

Bowling Alone: America's Declining Social Capital (1995)

 

Chapter 23: "Conflict between civilizations will be the latest phase in the evolution of conflict in the modern world."

Samuel Huntington Imagines a Post-9/ 11 World

The Clash of Civilizations? (1993)

 

Afterword

Further Readings

 

 

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ISBN-10: 0-205-84015-9

ISBN-13: 978-0-205-84015-1

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