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PACKAGE ISBN-13: 9780131381438

By Richard T. Vacca, Jo Anne L. Vacca, Maryann E. Mraz

Published by Pearson

Published Date: Jan 22, 2010

Components of the Package:

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Content Area Reading: Literacy and Learning Across the Curriculum, 10th Edition
By Richard T. Vacca, Jo Anne L. Vacca, Maryann E. Mraz

Description

Content Area Reading remains the market-leading text in content literacy and maintains the authors’ original objective–to offer an ambitious, coherent, and workable exploration of content literacy. Celebrating its 30th university, Vacca, Vacca, and new-to-this-edition co-author Mraz, have written this text to be an active learning tool, complete with real-world examples and research-based practices. Thoroughly updated, the text has been completely reorganized into two parts: Part 1, “Learners, Literacies, and Texts”, places the focus on the cultural, linguistic, and academic diversity of today’s learners; their personal and academic literacies, and the kinds of texts that are integral to their lives in and out of schools. Part 2, “Instructional Practices and Strategies”, contains a multitude of evidence-based instructional strategies waiting to be adapted to meet the conceptual demands inherent in disciplinary learning. Accessible and comprehensible, the text provides a foundation that can be applied across the disciplines, meeting the needs of all students.

 

0131381431 / 9780131381438 Content Area Reading: Literacy and Learning Across the Curriculum (with MyEducationLab)

 

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0135140870 / 9780135140871 MyEducationLab -- Access Card

013703511X / 9780137035113 Content Area Reading: Literacy and Learning Across the Curriculum

 

Table of Contents

PART ONE / Learners, Literacies, and Texts

CHAPTER 1

Literacy Matters 1

  ORGANIZING PRINCIPLE 1

  CHAPTER OVERVIEW 1

  FRAME OF MIND 2

Content and Process: Two Sides of the Same Coin 3

Balancing Content and Process in Content Area Classrooms 3

Pressure on Teachers 4

Teaching and Learning with Texts 5

Literacy in the Twenty-First Century 6

New Literacies, New Ways of Learning 8

Adolescent Literacy 9

BOX 1.1 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: Fifteen Elements

of Effective Adolescent Literacy Programs 11

Disciplinary Literacy in Perspective 12

BOX 1.2 / RTI FOR STRUGGLING ADOLESCENT LEARNERS: Implications

for Content Literacy 16

Reading to Learn 17

Reading as a Meaning-Making Process 17

Reading as a Strategic Process 18

Reading as a Comprehension Process 20

Prior Knowledge and Comprehension: A Closer Look 22

  LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD 24

  MINDS ON 25

  HANDS ON 26

  e-RESOURCES 27

CHAPTER 2

Learning with New Literacies 28

  ORGANIZING PRINCIPLE 28

  CHAPTER OVERVIEW 29

  FRAME OF MIND 30

An Overview of New Literacies 31

From the Arts to Media: Expanding Definitions of Literacy 32

Nonlinear Characteristics of New Literacies 32

Linking In-School with Out-of-School Literacies 33

BOX 2.1 / VOICES FROM THE CLASSROOM: William, Fifth-Grade Teacher 34

New Literacies and Content Standards 35

Thinking and Learning with New Literacies 36

Thinking and Learning in Multimodal Environments 37

BOX 2.2 / RTI FOR STRUGGLING ADOLESCENT LEARNERS: Strategy Intervention

and New Literacies 38

Learning How to Evaluate Websites 39

Blogs, Wikis, and Nings 39

Blogs 39

Wikis and Nings 42

Internet Workshops 44

Internet Inquiries 44

An Internet Inquiry in Elementary Science 45

Internet Projects 46

WebQuests 46

Writing to Learn in a New Literacies Paradigm 47

  LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD 48

  MINDS ON 49

  HANDS ON 49

  e-RESOURCES 49

CHAPTER 3

Culturally Responsive Teaching

in Diverse Classrooms 50

  ORGANIZING PRINCIPLE 50

  CHAPTER OVERVIEW 51

  FRAME OF MIND 52

BOX 3.1 / VOICES FROM THE CLASSROOM: Tim, High School Science Teacher 53

Teaching and Learning in Multicultural Classrooms 54

Teaching for Cultural Understanding 55

Integrating Multicultural Literature Across the Curriculum 56

BOX 3.2 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: ABCs of Cultural Understanding

and Communication 57

Multicultural Books: A Closer Look 58

Ways of Knowing in a Culturally Responsive Classroom 60

Funds of Knowledge 61

Characteristics of Culturally Responsive Instruction 62

BOX 3.3 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: Drawing on Students’

Funds of Knowledge in Science and Mathematics 63

BOX 3.4 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: Drawing on Students’

Funds of Knowledge in the Arts 64

Linguistic Differences in Today's Schools 66

Dialect Use in the Classroom 66

English Language Learning 67

Bilingual and ESL Programs 69

What Makes Content Literacy Difficult for English Learners? 69

Books for English Learners 70

BOX 3.5 / RTI FOR STRUGGLING ADOLESCENT LEARNERS: Responding

to the Language Needs of English Learners 71

BOX 3.6 / Picture Books in Mathematics 73

Sheltered Instruction for English Learners 73

The SIOP Model 74

Adapting Instruction in Content Classrooms 76

Provide Comprehensible Input 76

Use Strategies for Vocabulary Development 76

Differentiate Between Intensive and Extensive Reading 78

Use the Repeated Reading Strategy 79

Use Learning Strategies for Active Engagement 80

Use Writing Strategies 81

  LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD 82

  MINDS ON 83

  HANDS ON 83

  e-RESOURCES 83

CHAPTER 4

Assessing Students and Texts 84

  ORGANIZING PRINCIPLE 84

  CHAPTER OVERVIEW 85

  FRAME OF MIND 86

High-Stakes Testing and Authentic Approaches to Assessment 87

High-Stakes Testing: Issues and Concerns 87

Legislation, Standards, and Accountability 90

BOX 4.1 / RTI FOR STRUGGLING ADOLESCENT LEARNERS: Identifying Students

at Risk for Failure 91

Standardized Testing: What Teachers Need to Know 92

Authentic Assessment: The Teacher's Role 94

BOX 4.2 / VOICES FROM THE CLASSROOM: Cindy, Tenth-Grade Social Studies

Teacher 97

Portfolio Assessment 98

Adapting Portfolios to Content Area Classes 99

BOX 4.3 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: Steps in the Implementation

of Portfolios 100

Checklists and Interviews 102

Rubrics and Self-Assessments 107

Assessing Text Difficulty 108

Content Area Reading Inventories 108

Levels of Comprehension 110

Rates of Comprehension 112

Readability 113

Lexile Levels 113

The Fry Graph 114

Cloze Procedure 114

Readability Checklist 117

  LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD 120

  MINDS ON 121

  HANDS ON 122

  e-RESOURCES 123

CHAPTER 5

Planning Instruction

for Content Literacy 124

  ORGANIZING PRINCIPLE 124

  CHAPTER OVERVIEW 125

  FRAME OF MIND 126

Explicit Strategy Instruction 127

Strategy Awareness and Exploration 128

Strategy Demonstration and Modeling 129

Guided Practice 129

Strategy Application 130

Planning Lessons 130

Lesson Plan Formats 130

B—D—A Instructional Framework 131

Before-Reading Activities 134

During-Reading Activities 136

After-Reading Activities 138

Some More Examples of B—D—A—Centered Lessons 138

Middle School Science Class 139

High School French Class 141

Middle School Music Class 141

Planning Units of a Study 144

Components of a Well-Designed Unit 145

Content Objectives 145

Instructional Activities and Text Resources 146

An Inquiry/Research Emphasis in Units of Study 146

Steps and Stages Involved in Inquiry Projects 147

BOX 5.1 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: Procedures for Guiding Inquiry/

Research Projects 149

A Multiple-Text Emphasis in Units of Study 150

Planning Collaborative Interactions 152

Cooperative Learning 152

Jigsaw Groups 152

Student Teams Achievement Divisions (STAD) 153

Learning Circles 153

Group Investigation 154

Group Retellings 154

Small-Group Processes 155

Group Size 156

Group Composition 156

Group Goals and Tasks 156

Positive Interdependence 157

Group Roles and Division of Labor 158

Planning Discussions 159

Guided Discussion 159

Reflective Discussion 160

Creating an Environment for Discussion 160

Arrange the Classroom to Facilitate Discussion 160

Encourage Listening 161

Establish a Goal for Discussion 161

Focus the Discussion 161

Avoid Squelching Discussion 162

  LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD 162

  MINDS ON 163

  HANDS ON 163

  e-RESOURCES 165

PART TWO / Instructional Practices and Strategies

CHAPTER 6

Activating Prior Knowledge

and Interest 166

  ORGANIZING PRINCIPLE 166

  CHAPTER OVERVIEW 167

  FRAME OF MIND 168

Self-Efficacy and Motivation 169

BOX 6.1 / RTI FOR STRUGGLING ADOLESCENT LEARNERS: Strategy Interventions

for Active Engagement and Comprehension 169

BOX 6.2 / E-mail from Jacquinne Reynolds 171

Arousing Curiosity 173

Creating Story Impressions 173

BOX 6.3 / VOICES FROM THE CLASSROOM: Aaron, Eighth-Grade U.S. History

Teacher 174

BOX 6.4 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: Story Impressions 176

Establishing Problematic Perspectives 176

Guided Imagery 179

Making Predictions 180

BOX 6.5 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: PreP Procedure 181

Anticipation Guides 181

Adapting Anticipation Guides in Content Areas 182

Imagine, Elaborate, Predict, and Confirm (IEPC) 184

Question Generation 187

Active Comprehension 187

ReQuest 188

Expectation Outlines 189

BOX 6.6 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: ReQuest Procedure 190

Your Own Questions 191

  LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD 191

  MINDS ON 192

  HANDS ON 192

  e-RESOURCES 193

CHAPTER 7

Guiding Reading Comprehension 194

  ORGANIZING PRINCIPLE 194

  CHAPTER OVERVIEW 195

  FRAME OF MIND 196

Modeling Comprehension Strategies 197

Using Think-Alouds to Model Comprehension Strategies 197

Develop Hypotheses by Making Predictions 198

Develop Images 198

Share Analogies 199

Monitor Comprehension 199

Regulate Comprehension 199

Using Reciprocal Teaching to Model Comprehension Strategies 200

Using Question—Answer Relationships (QARs) to Model Comprehension

Strategies 200

BOX 7.1 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: QAR Awareness in a High School

English Class 203

Questioning the Author (QtA) 204

Planning a QtA Lesson 204

BOX 7.2 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: Steps in a QtA Lesson 205

Guiding the QtA Lesson 205

Instructional Strategies 206

The KWL Strategy 206

Procedures for KWL 207

KWL Examples 209

Discussion Webs 211

Procedures for the Discussion Web 213

Discussion Web Examples 214

Guided Reading Procedure (GRP) 216

Procedures for GRP 216

A GRP Example 217

Intra-Act 218

Procedures for Intra-Act 218

An Intra-Act Example 221

Directed Reading—Thinking Activity (DR—TA) 222

A DR—TA Example 223

Reading Guides 225

Comprehension Levels 226

Three-Level Comprehension Guides 227

Constructing Three-Level Comprehension Guides 229

A Three-Level Comprehension Guide Example 230

  LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD 231

  MINDS ON 232

  HANDS ON 232

  e-RESOURCES 233

CHAPTER 8

Developing Vocabulary and Concepts 234

  ORGANIZING PRINCIPLE 234

  CHAPTER OVERVIEW 235

  FRAME OF MIND 236

BOX 8.1 / RTI FOR STRUGGLING ADOLESCENT LEARNERS: Responsiveness

to Vocabulary and Concept Development 240

Experiences, Concepts, and Words 241

What Are Concepts? 241

Concept Relationships: An Example 241

Using Graphic Organizers to Make Connections Among Key Concepts 243

A Graphic Organizer Walk-Through 244

Showing Students How to Make Their Own Connections 249

Activating What Students Know About Words 250

Word Exploration 250

Brainstorming 250

List—Group—Label 251

Word Sorts 252

Knowledge Ratings 253

BOX 8.2 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: Two Examples of Knowledge

Ratings 254

Defining Words in the Context of Their Use 255

Vocabulary Self-Collection Strategy 255

Concept of Definition Word Maps 256

Reinforcing and Extending Vocabulary Knowledge and Concepts 258

Semantic Feature Analysis (SFA) 258

BOX 8.3 / VOICES FROM THE CLASSROOM: Tracy, Tenth-Grade Biology

Teacher 260

Categorization Activities 262

Concept Circles 262

Magic Squares 264

Vocabulary-Building Strategies 266

Using Context to Approximate Meaning 266

Typographic Clues 267

Syntactic and Semantic Clues 267

Context-Related Activities 270

Modified Cloze Passages 270

OPIN 270

Word Structure 271

Using the Dictionary as a Strategic Resource 273

  LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD 275

  MINDS ON 275

  HANDS ON 276

  e-RESOURCES 277

CHAPTER 9

Writing Across the Curriculum 278

  ORGANIZING PRINCIPLE 278

  CHAPTER OVERVIEW 279

  FRAME OF MIND 280

BOX 9.1 / RTI FOR STRUGGLING ADOLESCENT LEARNERS: Responsive Teaching

for At-Risk Writers 282

Integrating Reading and Writing 282

Reading and Writing as Composing Processes 282

Reading and Writing as Exploration, Motivation, and Clarification 284

Writing to Learn (WTL) 284

Microthemes 285

POVGs 286

Contents xvii

Unsent Letters 289

Biopoems 291

Admit Slips and Exit Slips 292

Academic Journals 293

Response Journals 294

Historical Character Journals 295

Sketchbooks in Art 295

Math Journals 298

Double-Entry Journals (DEJs) 300

Purposes for Using DEJs 301

Examples of DEJs in English and Math Classrooms 302

Learning Logs 304

Learning Logs in Math Classrooms 304

Writing in Disciplines 306

RAFT Writing 306

BOX 9.2 / VOICES FROM THE CLASSROOM: Wendy, Middle School Teacher

and Literacy Coach 307

Research-Based Writing 310

Guiding the Writing Process 311

The Discovery Stage 311

Drafting 312

Revising 313

  LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD 313

  MINDS ON 314

  HANDS ON 315

  e-RESOURCES 315

CHAPTER 10

Studying Text 316

  ORGANIZING PRINCIPLE 316

  CHAPTER OVERVIEW 317

  FRAME OF MIND 318

The Importance of Text Structure 319

External Text Structure 319

Internal Text Structure 320

Description 320

BOX 10.1 / VOICES FROM THE CLASSROOM: David, High School Civics

and Economics Teacher 321

Sequence 322

Comparison and Contrast 322

Cause and Effect 322

Problem and Solution 323

Signal Words in Text Structure 323

Graphic Organizers 324

BOX 10.2 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: Graphic Organizers 326

Using Graphic Organizers to Reflect Text Patterns 327

Comparison-and-Contrast Matrix 327

Problem-and-Solution Outline 327

Network Tree 330

Series-of-Events Chain 330

Using Questions with Graphic Organizers 331

Semantic (Cognitive) Mapping 333

Writing Summaries 335

Using GRASP to Write a Summary 335

BOX 10.3/ EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: Writing a Summary 336

Polishing a Summary 338

Making Notes, Taking Notes 339

Text Annotations 339

Note-Taking Procedures 341

Reading Logs 341

Annotations 342

T-Notes 343

Cornell Notes 343

Study Guides 346

Text Pattern Guides 346

Selective Reading Guides 348

  LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD 350

  MINDS ON 351

  HANDS ON 352

  e-RESOURCES 353

CHAPTER 11

Learning with

Trade Books 354

  ORGANIZING PRINCIPLE 354

  CHAPTER OVERVIEW 355

  FRAME OF MIND 356

Textbooks in Today's Classrooms 357

fm.indd xix 12/8/2009 12:31:37 PM

Reasons Teachers Use Textbooks 357

Problems with Using Textbooks 358

Inconsiderate Texts 359

Inaccuracy 359

Inappropriate Reading Level 359

Negative Student Reactions 359

Why Use Trade Books? 360

Learning with Trade Books 362

Nonfiction Books 363

BOX 11.1 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: Appreciating Art and Artists

Through the Use of Trade Books 366

BOX 11.2 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: Linking Physical Education

with Literacy Learning 369

Picture Books 369

Fiction Books 373

Books for Unmotivated Readers 375

BOX 11.3 / EVIDENCE-BASED BEST PRACTICES: Exploring Different Points

of View Toward Historical Events 376

Instructional Strategies for Using Trade Books 377

Creating Classroom Libraries and Text Sets 377

BOX 11.4 / VOICES FROM THE CLASSROOM: Garrett, Eighth-Grade American

History Teacher 378

Self-Selected Reading 380

Teacher Read-Alouds 382

Group Models for Studying Trade Books 384

Whole-Group/Single-Book Model 384

Small-Groups/Multiple-Books Model 385

Individual Inquiry Model 385

Reader Response Strategies 386

Writing as a Reader Response 387

Reflective Writing 387

Post-It Notes 388

Expository Texts as Models for Writing 388

Process Drama as a Heuristic 389

Improvisational Drama 390

Pantomime 390

Tableau 391

Readers Theatre 391

Idea Circles 392

Getting Started with Idea Circles 393

Using Technology to Respond to Literature 394

Blogging 395

Googledocs 395

  LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD 396

  MINDS ON 396

  HANDS ON 397

  e-RESOURCES 397

CHAPTER 12

Literacy Coaching 398

  ORGANIZING PRINCIPLE 398

  CHAPTER OVERVIEW 399

  FRAME OF MIND 400

Literacy Coaching in Perspective 400

Current Expectations for Literacy Coaches 401

BOX 12.1 / RTI FOR STRUGGLING ADOLESCENT LEARNERS: The Role of Literacy

Coaches 402

Standards for Literacy Coaching 404

Literacy Coaches and Teachers 406

Building Learning Communities: A Closer Look 406

Conferring with Teachers 407

Supporting Professional Development 409

BOX 12.2 / VOICES FROM THE CLASSROOM: Lynne, Middle School Literacy

Coach 410

BOX 12.3 / VOICES FROM THE CLASSROOM: Jean, High School Literacy Coach 412

Literacy Coaches and Students 413

Supporting Struggling Readers 413

Supporting English Language Learners 414

Supporting Effective Assessment Practices 415

  LOOKING BACK, LOOKING FORWARD 416

  MINDS ON 417

  HANDS ON 417

  e-RESOURCES 417

APPENDIX A: Ordeal by Cheque 418

APPENDIX B: Affixes with Invariant Meanings 422

APPENDIX C: Commonly Used Prefixes with

Varying Meanings 425

APPENDIX D: Graphic Organizers with Text Frames 427

References 430

Name Index 457

Subject Index 463

 

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ISBN-13: 978-0-13-138143-8

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