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Janson's History of Art Portable Edition Book 1: The Ancient World, 8th Edition

By Penelope J.E. Davies, Walter B. Denny, Frima Fox Hofrichter, Joseph F. Jacobs, Ann S. Roberts, David L. Simon

Published by Pearson

Published Date: Dec 27, 2010

Description

For courses in the History of Art.

 

Rewritten and reorganized, this new edition weaves together the most recent scholarship, the most current thinking in art history, and the most innovative online supplements, including MyArtsLab and the Prentice Hall Digital Art Library. Experience the new Janson and re-experience the history of art.

 

The Portable Edition of Janson’s History of Art, Eighth Edition features four lightweight, paperback books packaged together along with optional access to a powerful student website, www.myartslab.com, making the text more student friendly than ever.  Janson’s History of Art is still available in the original hardcover edition and in Volume I and Volume II splits. The Portable Edition is comprised of four books, each representing a major period of art history.

 

Long established as the classic and seminal introduction to art of the Western world, the Eighth Edition of Janson's History of Art is groundbreaking. When Harry Abrams first published the History of Art in 1962, John F. Kennedy occupied the White House, and Andy Warhol was an emerging artist.  Janson offered his readers a strong focus on Western art, an important consideration of technique and style, and a clear point of view. The History of Art, said Janson, was not just a stringing together of historically significant objects, but the writing of a story about their interconnections, a history of styles and of stylistic change. Janson’s text focused on the visual and technical characteristics of the objects he discussed, often in extraordinarily eloquent language. Janson’s History of Art helped to establish the canon of art history for many generations of scholars.

 

The new Eighth Edition, although revised to remain current with new discoveries and scholarship, continues to follow Janson’s lead in important ways: It is limited to the Western tradition, with a chapter on Islamic art and its relationship to Western art. It keeps the focus of the discussion on the object, its manufacture, and its visual character. It considers the contribution of the artist as an important part of the analysis. This edition maintains an organization along the lines established by Janson, with separate chapters on the Northern European Renaissance, the Italian Renaissance, the High Renaissance, and Baroque art, with stylistic divisions for key periods of the modern era. Also embedded in this edition is the narrative of how art has changed over time in the cultures that Europe has claimed as its patrimony.

Table of Contents

Preface xiv

Faculty and Student Resources for Teaching and Learning with Janson’s History of Art xix

Introduction xxi

 

PART ONE: THE ANCIENT WORLD

 

Chapter 1: Prehistoric Art

PALEOLITHIC ART 2

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Cave Painting 5

Interpreting Prehistoric Painting 5

Paleolithic Carving 7

INFORMING ART: Telling Time: Labels and Periods 9

Paleolithic houses 11

NEOLITHIC ART 11

Settled Societies and Neolithic Art 11

Architecture in Europe: Tombs and Rituals 15

INFORMING ART: Dating Techniques 17

 

Chapter 2: Ancient Near Eastern Art

SUMERIAN ART 22

Temple Architecture: Linking Heaven and Earth 23

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Mud Brick 23

Sculpture and Inlay 25

PRIMARY SOURCES: The Gilgamesh Epic 25

Visual Narratives 27

Cylinder Seals 29

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: Losses Through Looting 29

ART OF AKKAD 30

Sculpture: Power and Narrative 30

NEO-SUMERIAN REVIVAL 32

Architecture: The Ziggurat of Ur 32

Sculpture: Figures of Gudea 32

PRIMARY SOURCES: Texts on Gudea Figures from Lagash and Surrounding Areas, ca. 2100 33

BABYLONIAN ART 33

The Code of Hammurabi 34

ASSYRIAN ART 34

PRIMARY SOURCES: The Code of Hammurabi 35

Art of Empire: Expressing Royal Power 37

LATE BABYLONIAN ART 37

The Royal Palace 38

REGIONAL NEAR EASTERN ART 38

The Hittites 40

The Phoenicians 40

The Hebrews 41

IRANIAN ART 41

Early Iranian Art 42

The Persian Empire: Cosmopolitan Heirs to the Mesopotamian Tradition 43

Mesopotamia Between Persian and Islamic Dominion 46


Chapter 3: Egyptian Art

PREDYNASTIC AND EARLY DYNASTIC ART 50

The Palette of King Narmer 50

INFORMING ART: Egyptian Gods and Goddesses 52

THE OLD KINGDOM: A GOLDEN AGE 53

Old Kingdom Funerary Complexes 53

INFORMING ART: Major Periods in Ancient Egypt 54

The Pyramids at Giza: Reflecting a New Royal Role 55

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Building the Pyramids 56

PRIMARY SOURCES: Excerpt from the Pyramid Text of Unis (r. 2341–2311 BCE) 58

Representing the Human Figure 59

THE MIDDLE KINGDOM: REASSERTING

TRADITION THROUGH THE ARTS 62

Royal Portraiture: Changing Expressions and Proportions 62

Funerary Architecture 63

THE NEW KINGDOM: RESTORED GLORY 65

Royal Burials in the Valley of the Kings 65

Temples to the Gods 67

Block Statues 70

Images in New Kingdom Tombs 71

AKHENATEN AND THE AMARNA STYLE 72

The Amarna Style 72

Tutankhamun and the Aftermath of Amarna 75

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: Interpreting Ancient Travel Writers 75

PAPYRUS SCROLLS: THE BOOK OF THE DEAD 77

PRIMARY SOURCES: The Book of the Dead 77

LATE EGYPT 78

 

Chapter 4: Aegean Art

EARLY CYCLADIC ART 82

MINOAN ART 84

The “Palace” at Knossos 84

Wall Paintings: Representing Rituals and Nature 86

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: Two Excavators, Legend, and Archaeology 87

Minoan Pottery 89

Carved Minoan Stone Vessels 90

Late Minoan Art 92

MYCENAEAN ART 93

Architecture: Citadels 93

Mycenaean Tombs and Their Contents 96

Sculpture 99

 

Chapter 5: Greek Art

THE EMERGENCE OF GREEK ART: THE GEOMETRIC STYLE 104

INFORMING ART: Greek Gods and Goddesses 105

Geometric Style Pottery 105

Geometric Style Sculpture 107

THE ORIENTALIZING STYLE: HORIZONS EXPAND 107

Miniature Vessels 108

ARCHAIC ART: ART OF THE CITY-STATE 109

The Rise of Monumental Temple Architecture 109

STONE SCULPTURE 113

Architectural Sculpture: The Building Comes Alive 115

Vase Painting: Art of the Symposium 119

THE CLASSICAL AGE 123

Classical Sculpture 123

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: The Indirect Lost-Wax Process 128

Architecture and Sculpture on the Athenian Akropolis 131

PRIMARY SOURCES: Aristotle (384–322 BCE) 133

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: Repatriation of Cultural Heritage 134

PRIMARY SOURCES: Plutarch (ca. 46–after 119 CE) 136

THE LATE CLASSICAL PERIOD 141

Late Classical Architecture: Civic and Sacred 141

Late Classical sculpture 142

Painting in the Late Classical Age 145

THE AGE OF ALEXANDER AND THE HELLENISTIC PERIOD 147

Architecture: The Scholarly Tradition and Theatricality 148

City Planning 150

Hellenistic Sculpture: Expression and Movement 154

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: J.J. Winckelmann and the Apollo Belvedere 157

Hellenistic Painting 161

 

Chapter 6: Etruscan Art

FUNERARY ART 165

Tombs and Their Contents 166

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Etruscan Gold-Working 169

ARCHITECTURE 173

City Planning 174

SCULPTURE 175

Dynamism in Terra Cotta and Bronze 175

 

Chapter 7: Roman Art

EARLY ROME AND THE REPUBLIC 181

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: Recognizing Copies: The Case of the Laocoön 183

NEW DIRECTIONS IN ARCHITECTURE 183

Sculpture 188

PRIMARY SOURCES: Cicero (106–43 BCE) 192

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Copying Greek Sculptures 193

Painting and Mosaic 194

PRIMARY SOURCES: Polybius (ca. 200–ca. 118 BCE) 194

THE EARLY EMPIRE 195

Architecture 196

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: Two Pantheon Problems 202

Portrait Sculpture 203

Relief Sculpture 207

PRIMARY SOURCES: Josephus (37/8–ca. 100 CE) 210

Art and Architecture in the Provinces 213

Domestic Art and Architecture 216

THE LATE EMPIRE 222

Architecture 222

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Painted Stone in Greece and Rome 223

Architecture in the Provinces 227

Portrait Sculpture 228

Relief Sculpture 229

 

Glossary

Bibliography

Index

Credits

Purchase Info

ISBN-10: 0-205-16110-3

ISBN-13: 978-0-205-16110-2

Format: Alternate Binding

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