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Janson's History of Art Portable Edition Book 2: The Middle Ages, 8th Edition

By Penelope J.E. Davies, Walter B. Denny, Frima Fox Hofrichter, Joseph F. Jacobs, Ann S. Roberts, David L. Simon

Published by Pearson

Published Date: Dec 27, 2010

Description

For courses in the History of Art.

 

Rewritten and reorganized, this new edition weaves together the most recent scholarship, the most current thinking in art history, and the most innovative online supplements, including MyArtsLab and the Prentice Hall Digital Art Library. Experience the new Janson and re-experience the history of art.

 

The Portable Edition of Janson’s History of Art, Eighth Edition features four lightweight, paperback books packaged together along with optional access to a powerful student website, www.myartslab.com, making the text more student friendly than ever.  Janson’s History of Art is still available in the original hardcover edition and in Volume I and Volume II splits. The Portable Edition is comprised of four books, each representing a major period of art history:

 

Long established as the classic and seminal introduction to art of the Western world, the Eighth Edition of Janson's History of Art is groundbreaking. When Harry Abrams first published the History of Art in 1962, John F. Kennedy occupied the White House, and Andy Warhol was an emerging artist.  Janson offered his readers a strong focus on Western art, an important consideration of technique and style, and a clear point of view. The History of Art, said Janson, was not just a stringing together of historically significant objects, but the writing of a story about their interconnections, a history of styles and of stylistic change. Janson’s text focused on the visual and technical characteristics of the objects he discussed, often in extraordinarily eloquent language. Janson’s History of Art helped to establish the canon of art history for many generations of scholars.

 

The new Eighth Edition, although revised to remain current with new discoveries and scholarship, continues to follow Janson’s lead in important ways: It is limited to the Western tradition, with a chapter on Islamic art and its relationship to Western art. It keeps the focus of the discussion on the object, its manufacture, and its visual character. It considers the contribution of the artist as an important part of the analysis. This edition maintains an organization along the lines established by Janson, with separate chapters on the Northern European Renaissance, the Italian Renaissance, the High Renaissance, and Baroque art, with stylistic divisions for key periods of the modern era. Also embedded in this edition is the narrative of how art has changed over time in the cultures that Europe has claimed as its patrimony.

Table of Contents

Preface xiv

Faculty and Student Resources for Teaching and Learning with Janson’s History of Art xix

Introduction xxi

 

PART TWO: THE MIDDLE AGES

 

Chapter 8: Early Jewish, Early Christian, and Byzantine Art

EARLY JEWISH ART 237

EARLY CHRISTIAN ART 240

Christian Art before Constantine 240

INFORMING ART: The Life of Jesus 241

PRIMARY SOURCES: The Book of the Popes (Liber Pontificalis) 244

Christian Art after Official Recognition of Christianity 245

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Mosaics 248

BYZANTINE ART 254

Early Byzantine Art 254

PRIMARY SOURCES: Procopius of Caesarea (Sixth Century) 258

The Iconoclastic Controversy 265

Middle Byzantine Art 265

PRIMARY SOURCES: St. Theodore the Studite (759–826 CE) 266

Late Byzantine Art 273

INFORMING ART: Biblical and Celestial Beings 273

 

Chapter 9: Islamic Art

Religious Architecture 280

PRIMARY SOURCES: Muhammad Ibn Mahmud Al-Amuli (Iran, 14th Century) 280

THE FORMATION OF ISLAMIC ART 281

INFORMING ART: Islam and Its Messenger 283

Secular Architecture 284

THE DEVELOPMENT OF ISLAMIC STYLE 285

Religious Architecture 285

Luxury Arts 287

ISLAMIC ART AND THE PERSIAN INHERITANCE 287

Architecture 287

Figural Art Forms in Iran 288

THE CLASSICAL AGE 290

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: Spanish Islamic Art and Europe in the Middle Ages 290

The Fatimid Artistic Impact 291

The Ayyubids and the Seljuk Turks of Asia Minor 292

LATER CLASSICAL ART AND ARCHITECTURE 294

Mongol Patronage 295

Timurid Patronage 295

Mamluk Patronage 296

Nasrid Patronage: The Alhambra 299

THE THREE LATE EMPIRES 300

PRIMARY SOURCES: The Ottoman Sultan Selim II (1524–1574) 300

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: The Oriental Carpet 301

The Ottomans in Europe and Asia 302

The Safavid Period in Iran 304

The Mughal Period in India 308

PRIMARY SOURCES: Abd Al-Hamid Lahori (d. 1654) 309

CONTINUITY AND CHANGE IN ISLAMIC ART 310

 

Chapter 10: Early Medieval Art

ANGLO-SAXON ART 314

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Metalwork 315

The Animal Style 316

HIBERNO-SAXON ART 318

Manuscripts 318

PRIMARY SOURCES: Lindisfarne Gospels 320

VIKING ART 322

CAROLINGIAN ART 324

Sculpture 324

Illuminated Books 325

Architecture 328

PRIMARY SOURCES: Hariulf (ca.1060–1143) 331

PRIMARY SOURCES: St. Angilbert (ca. 750–814) 332

OTTONIAN ART 333

Architecture 333

Metalwork 336

Ivories and Manuscripts: Conveyors of Imperial Grandeur 340

Sculpture 343

 

Chapter 11: Romanesque Art

FIRST EXPRESSIONS OF ROMANESQUE STYLE 349

Architecture 349

Monumental Stone Sculpture 350

MATURE ROMANESQUE 351

Pilgrimage Churches and Their Art 351

PRIMARY SOURCES: The Pilgrim’s Guide 352

Cluniac Architecture and Sculpture 356

PRIMARY SOURCES: St. Bernard of Clairvaux (1090–1153) 359

Cluniac Wall Painting 365

Cistercian Architecture and Art 366

Other Benedictine Architecture and Wall Painting 367

Book Illustration 368

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: Preserving and Restoring Architecture 369

OTHER REGIONAL VARIANTS OF ROMANESQUE STYLE 372

Western France: Poitou 372

Southeastern France: Provence 373

The Holy Land 374

Tuscany 375

Germany 378

The Meuse Valley: Mosan Style 379

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Vaulting 380

Normandy and England 381

THE PARADOXICAL MEANING OF ROMANESQUE 386

 

Chapter 12: Gothic Art

EARLY GOTHIC ART IN FRANCE 391

Saint-Denis: Suger and the Beginnings of Gothic Architecture 391

PRIMARY SOURCES: Suger of Saint-Denis (1081–1151) 393

Chartres Cathedral 395

Laon Cathedral 397

Cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris 398

HIGH GOTHIC ART IN FRANCE 399

The Rebuilding of Chartres Cathedral 400

PRIMARY SOURCES: Theophilus Presbyter (12th Century) 402

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Stained Glass 405

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: Modules and Proportions 406

Amiens Cathedral 408

Reims Cathedral 408

RAYONNANT OR COURT STYLE 413

Sainte-Chapelle 413

Saint-Urbain in Troyes 415

Manuscript Illumination 416

LATE GOTHIC ART IN FRANCE 418

Manuscript Illumination 418

Sculpture 420

Architecture: The Flamboyant Phase 422

THE SPREAD OF GOTHIC ART 423

Spain 423

England 426

Germany 430

 

Glossary

Bibliography

Index

Credits

This title is also sold in the various packages listed below. Before purchasing one of these packages, speak with your professor about which one will help you be successful in your course.

Package ISBN-13: 9780205908899

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  • Janson's History of Art Portable Edition Book 4: The Modern World, 8th Edition
    Penelope J.E. Davies, Frima Fox Hofrichter, Joseph F. Jacobs, Family Trust Janson, Ann S. Roberts, David L. Simon
  • Janson's History of Art Portable Edition Book 3: The Renaissance through the Rococo, 8th Edition
    Penelope J.E. Davies, Walter B. Denny, Frima Fox Hofrichter, Joseph F. Jacobs, Ann S. Roberts, David L. Simon

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