Product Cover Image

Janson's History of Art Portable Edition Book 4: The Modern World, 8th Edition

By Penelope J.E. Davies, Frima Fox Hofrichter, Joseph F. Jacobs, Family Trust Janson, Ann S. Roberts, David L. Simon

Published by Pearson

Published Date: Dec 27, 2010

Description

For courses in the History of Art.

 

Rewritten and reorganized, this new edition weaves together the most recent scholarship, the most current thinking in art history, and the most innovative online supplements, including MyArtsLab and the Prentice Hall Digital Art Library. Experience the new Janson and re-experience the history of art.

 

The Portable Edition of Janson’s History of Art, Eighth Edition features four lightweight, paperback books packaged together along with optional access to a powerful student website, www.myartslab.com, making the text more student friendly than ever.  Janson’s History of Art is still available in the original hardcover edition and in Volume I and Volume II splits. The Portable Edition is comprised of four books, each representing a major period of art history:

 

Long established as the classic and seminal introduction to art of the Western world, the Eighth Edition of Janson's History of Art is groundbreaking. When Harry Abrams first published the History of Art in 1962, John F. Kennedy occupied the White House, and Andy Warhol was an emerging artist.  Janson offered his readers a strong focus on Western art, an important consideration of technique and style, and a clear point of view. The History of Art, said Janson, was not just a stringing together of historically significant objects, but the writing of a story about their interconnections, a history of styles and of stylistic change. Janson’s text focused on the visual and technical characteristics of the objects he discussed, often in extraordinarily eloquent language. Janson’s History of Art helped to establish the canon of art history for many generations of scholars.

 

The new Eighth Edition, although revised to remain current with new discoveries and scholarship, continues to follow Janson’s lead in important ways: It is limited to the Western tradition, with a chapter on Islamic art and its relationship to Western art. It keeps the focus of the discussion on the object, its manufacture, and its visual character. It considers the contribution of the artist as an important part of the analysis. This edition maintains an organization along the lines established by Janson, with separate chapters on the Northern European Renaissance, the Italian Renaissance, the High Renaissance, and Baroque art, with stylistic divisions for key periods of the modern era. Also embedded in this edition is the narrative of how art has changed over time in the cultures that Europe has claimed as its patrimony.

Table of Contents

Preface xiv

Faculty and Student Resources for Teaching and Learning with Janson’s History of Art xix

Introduction xxi

 

PART FOUR: THE MODERN WORLD

 

Chapter 23: Art in the Age of the Enlightenment, 1750—1789

ROME TOWARD 1760: THE FONT OF NEOCLASSICISM 787

Artistic Foundations of Neoclassicism: Mengs and Hamilton 788

ROMANTICISM IN ROME: PIRANESI 789

NEOCLASSICISM IN BRITAIN 790

Sculpture and Painting: Historicism, Morality, and Antiquity 791

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Josiah Wedgwood and Neoclassical Jasperware 792

The Birth of Contemporary History Painting 793

Grand Manner Portraiture in the Neoclassical Style: Joshua Reynolds 795

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: The Elusive Meaning of West’s The Death of General Wolfe 795

Architecture and Interiors: The Palladian Revival 796

EARLY ROMANTICISM IN BRITAIN 798

Architecture and Landscape Design: The Sublime and the Picturesque 799

Early Romantic Painting in Britain 801

Romanticism in Grand Manner Portraiture: Thomas Gainsborough 805

NEOCLASSICISM IN FRANCE 806

Architecture: Rational Classicism 806

The Sublime in Neoclassical Architecture: The Austere and the Visionary 808

Painting and Sculpture: Expressing Enlightenment Values 810

PRIMARY SOURCES: Denis Diderot (1713—1784) 812

The Climax of Neoclassicism: The Paintings of Jacques-Louis David 813

PRIMARY SOURCES: Étienne-Jean Delécluze (1781—1863) 813

Neoclassical Portraiture: Marie-Louise-Élisabeth Vigée-Lebrun 816

ITALIAN NEOCLASSICISM TOWARD 1785 817

Neoclassical Sculpture: Antonio Canova 817

 

Chapter 24: Art in the Age of Romanticism, 1789—1848

PAINTING 823

Spain: Francisco Goya 823

Britain: Spiritual Intensity and the Bond with Nature 825

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Blake’s Printing Process 827

PRIMARY SOURCES: John Constable (1776—1837) 829

Germany: Friedrich’s Pantheistic Landscape 831

America: Landscape as Metaphor 832

France: Neoclassical Romanticism 835

France: Painterly Romanticism and Romantic Landscape 840

PRIMARY SOURCES: Eugène Delacroix (1798—1863) 845

Romantic Landscape Painting 847

ROMANTIC SCULPTURE 850

ROMANTIC REVIVALS IN ARCHITECTURE 851

Britain: The Sublime and the Picturesque 851

Germany: Creating a New Athens 854

America: An Ancient Style for a New Republic 854

France: Empire Style 856

 

Chapter 25: The Age of Positivism: Realism, Impressionism, and the Pre-Raphaelites, 1848—1885

REALISM IN FRANCE 860

Realism in the 1840s and 1850s: Painting Contemporary Social Conditions 861

The Realist Assault on Academic Values and Bourgeois Taste 866

Impressionism: A Different Form of Realism 871

PRIMARY SOURCES: Lila Cabot Perry (1848?—1933) 872

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Impressionist Color Theory 874

BRITISH REALISM 881

The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood 881

The Aesthetic Movement: Personal Psychology and Repressed Eroticism 884

PRIMARY SOURCES: James Abbott McNeill Whistler (1834—1903) 885

REALISM IN AMERICA 887

Scientific Realism: Thomas Eakins 887

Iconic Imagery: Winslow Homer 888

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: An Artist's Reputation and Changes in Art Historical Methodology 889

PHOTOGRAPHY: A MECHANICAL MEDIUM FOR MASS-PRODUCED ART 890

First Innovations 891

Recording the World 891

Reporting the News: Photojournalism 894

Photography as Art: Pictorialism and Combination Printing 895

PRIMARY SOURCES: Charles Baudelaire (1821—1867) 896

ARCHITECTURE AND THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION 897

Ferrovitreous Structures: Train Sheds and Exhibition Palaces 898

Historic Eclecticism and Technology 899

Announcing the Future: The Eiffel Tower 900

 

Chapter 26: Progress and Its Discontents: Post-Impressionism, Symbolism, and Art Nouveau, 1880—1905

POST-IMPRESSIONISM 905

Paul Cézanne: Toward Abstraction 905

PRIMARY SOURCES: Paul Cézanne (1839—1906) 907

Georges Seurat: Seeking Social and Pictorial Harmony 908

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec: An Art for the Demimonde 911

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Lithography 911

Vincent van Gogh: Expression Through Color and Symbol 912

Paul Gauguin: The Flight from Modernity 915

PRIMARY SOURCES: Paul Gauguin (1848—1903) 917

SYMBOLISM 917

The Nabis 917

Other Symbolist Visions in France 918

Symbolism Beyond France 920

Symbolist Currents in American Art 922

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: Feminist Art History 923

The Sculpture of Rodin 924

ART NOUVEAU AND THE SEARCH FOR MODERN DESIGN 927

The Public and Private Spaces of Art Nouveau 927

AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE: THE CHICAGO SCHOOL 931

Henry Hobson Richardson: Laying the Foundation for Modernist Architecture 931

Louis Sullivan and Early Skyscrapers 932

Frank Lloyd Wright and the Prairie House 934

PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE ADVENT OF FILM 936

Pictorialist Photography and the Photo Secession 936

Documentary Photography 939

Motion Photography and Moving Pictures 940

 

Chapter 27: Toward Abstraction: The Modernist Revolution, 1904—1914

FAUVISM 946

CUBISM 950

Reflecting and Shattering Tradition: Les Demoiselles d’Avignon 950

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: The Myth of the Primitive 951

Analytic Cubism: Picasso and Braque 952

Synthetic Cubism: The Power of Collage 953

THE IMPACT OF FAUVISM AND CUBISM 955

German Expressionism 955

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: The Woodcut in German Expressionism 958

PRIMARY SOURCES: Vasily Kandinsky (1866—1944) 960

Austrian Expressionism 962

Cubism after Picasso and Braque: Paris 963

Italian Futurism: The Visualization of Movement and Energy 964

Cubo-Futurism and Suprematism in Russia 966

PRIMARY SOURCES: Kazimir Malevich (1878—1935) 968

Cubism and Fantasy: Marc Chagall and Giorgio de Chirico 969

MARCEL DUCHAMP AND THE ADVENT OF AN ART OF IDEAS 970

CONSTANTIN BRANCUSI AND THE BIRTH OF MODERNIST SCULPTURE 972

AMERICAN ART 974

America’s First Modernists: Arthur Dove and Marsden Hartley 975

EARLY MODERN ARCHITECTURE IN EUROPE 976

Austrian and German Modernist Architecture 976

German Expressionist Architecture 979

 

Chapter 28: Art Between the Wars

DADA 985

Zurich Dada: Jean Arp 985

New York Dada: Marcel Duchamp 986

Berlin Dada 987

Cologne Dada 991

PRIMARY SOURCES: Hannah Höch (1889—1978) 991

Paris Dada: Man Ray 992

SURREALISM 993

Picasso and Surrealism 993

Surrealism in Paris: Spurring the Imagination 995

Representational Surrealism: Magritte and Dalí 996

Surrealism and Photography 999

The Surrealist Object 999

ORGANIC SCULPTURE OF THE 1930S 1000

Alexander Calder in Paris 1001

Henry Moore and Barbara Hepworth in England 1002

PRIMARY SOURCES: Barbara Hepworth (1903—1975) 1003

CREATING UTOPIAS 1003

Russian Constructivism: Productivism and Utilitarianism 1003

De Stijl and Universal Order 1005

The Bauhaus: Creating the “New Man” 1007

PRIMARY SOURCES: Piet Mondrian (1872—1944) 1007

The Machine Aesthetic in Paris 1011

PRIMARY SOURCES: Le Corbusier (1886—1965) 1012

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Reinforced Concrete 1013

ART IN AMERICAN: MODERNITY, SPIRITUALITY, AND REGIONALISM 1015

The City and Industry 1015

Art Deco and the International Style 1020

Seeking the Spiritual 1021

Regionalism and National Identity 1023

The Harlem Renaissance 1024

MEXICAN ART: SEEKING A NATIONAL IDENTITY 1025

Diego Rivera 1025

THE EVE OF WORLD WAR II 1028

America: The Failure of Modernity 1028

Europe: The Rise of Fascism 1030

 

Chapter 29: Postwar to Postmodern, 1945—1980

EXISTENTIALISM IN NEW YORK: ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM 1036

The Bridge from Surrealism to Abstract Expressionism: Arshile Gorky 1036

Abstract Expressionism: Action Painting 1038

PRIMARY SOURCES: Jackson Pollock (1912—1956) 1038

Abstract Expressionism: Color-Field Painting 1040

New York Sculpture: David Smith and Louise Nevelson 1041

EXISTENTIALISM IN EUROPE: FIGURAL EXPRESSIONISM 1042

Jean Dubuffet 1042

Francis Bacon 1043

REJECTING ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM: AMERICAN ART OF THE 1950s AND 1960s 1044

Re-Presenting Life and Dissecting Painting 1044

Environments and Performance Art 1046

Pop Art: Consumer Culture as Subject 1049

PRIMARY SOURCES: Roy Lichtenstein (1923—1997) 1050

FORMALIST ABSTRACTION OF THE 1950s AND 1960s 1053

Formalist Painting 1053

Formalist Sculpture: Minimal Art 1056

PRIMARY SOURCES: Frank Stella (b. 1936) 1056

THE PLURALIST 1970s: POST-MINIMALISM 1058

Post-Minimal Sculpture: Geometry and Emotion 1058

Earthworks and Site-Specific Art 1059

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: Studying the Absent Object 1059

Conceptual Art: Art as Idea 1062

Television Art: Nam June Paik 1063

ART WITH A SOCIAL AGENDA 1064

Street Photography 1064

African-American Art: Ethnic Identity 1065

PRIMARY SOURCES: Romare Bearden (1911—1988) 1066

Feminist Art: Judy Chicago and Gender Identity 1068

LATE MODERNIST ARCHITECTURE 1069

Continuing the International Style: Ludwig Mies van der Rohe 1069

Sculptural Architecture: Referential Mass 1070

 

Chapter 30: The Postmodern Era: Art Since 1980

ARCHITECTURE 1077

Postmodern Architecture: A Referential Style 1077

New Modernisms: High-Tech Architecture 1080

Deconstructivism: Countering Modernist Authority 1082

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES: Computer-Aided Design in Architecture 1085

POSTMINIMALISM AND PLURALISM: LIMITLESS POSSIBILITIES IN FINE ART 1085

The Return of Painting 1085

Sculpture 1089

APPROPRIATION ART: DECONSTRUCTING IMAGES 1091

PRIMARY SOURCES: Cindy Sherman (b. 1954) 1091

Photography and LED Signs 1092

Context and Meaning in Art: The Institutional Critique and Art as Commodity 1094

MULTICULTURALISM AND POLITICAL ART 1096

African-American Identity 1096

The AIDS Pandemic and a Preoccupation with the Body 1098

The Power of Installation, Video, and Large-Scale Photography 1100

PRIMARY SOURCES: Ilya Kabakov (b. 1933) 1102

THE ART HISTORIAN’S LENS: The Changing Art Market 1104

GLOBAL ART 1105

El Anatsui, Adinkra Signs, and Postmodern Ambiguity 1105

Cai Guo Qing: Projects for Extraterrestrials 1106

Glossary

Bibliography

Index

Credits

This title is also sold in the various packages listed below. Before purchasing one of these packages, speak with your professor about which one will help you be successful in your course.

Package ISBN-13: 9780205908899

Includes this title packaged with:

  • Janson's History of Art Portable Edition Book 2: The Middle Ages, 8th Edition
    Penelope J.E. Davies, Walter B. Denny, Frima Fox Hofrichter, Joseph F. Jacobs, Ann S. Roberts, David L. Simon
  • Janson's History of Art Portable Edition Book 3: The Renaissance through the Rococo, 8th Edition
    Penelope J.E. Davies, Walter B. Denny, Frima Fox Hofrichter, Joseph F. Jacobs, Ann S. Roberts, David L. Simon

$284.40 | Add to Cart

Purchase Info

ISBN-10: 0-205-16115-4

ISBN-13: 978-0-205-16115-7

Format: Alternate Binding

$94.80 | Free Ground Shipping.

Add to Cart

Digital Choices

MyLab & Mastering ?

MyLab & Mastering products deliver customizable content and highly personalized study paths, responsive learning tools, and real-time evaluation and diagnostics. MyLab & Mastering products help move students toward the moment that matters most—the moment of true understanding and learning.